Other People's Children

By Stan Taylor Written on:




Want to make a start on your will?

Making a will is simple

Making a Will is not about wealth it is about making sure that what you want to happen to your estate does happen. It gives you the opportunity to specify such things as who will administer your estate, who will care for your children and who will receive specific items of your property.


You may wish to leave something to a friend's children. Perhaps you are childless and wish to distribute your estate between the children of other family members.

Obviously, you can refer to your nephews and nieces as just that. You may also have godchildren who may be described as such although it is best to add their names. (`My godson Geoffrey Brown.

') Be careful if you are leaving gifts to the children of more than one family. This is an area where the layman's interpretation can differ from the established legal rules of construction. A gift to 'the children of A and B' will be construed as giving a gift to A's children and to B not to B's children.

If you wish to leave the gift to B's children as well as Ns children, it is necessary to say 'to the children of A and the children of B'. A more elegant way of doing this is to say 'to Mary, Jane and Anne Blogs, children of my friend Roberta Blogs and Fred, Michael and Andrew Jones, children of my friend Susan Jones'.


Learn more - Minor Children or Who May Benefit From A Will? - Divorcees


Will Making basics

Free Will Sample download

see: Making a will - The Law Society. Please note that will making differs in Scotland and this website currently deals with English laFree Will download

 

Perhaps you might consider taking legal advice from a solicitor about making a will if any of the following apply to your circumstances:

 

  1. A number of people could make a claim on your estate when you pass away because they depend on yourself financially
  2. You want to include a trust in your will (perhaps to provide for children, to save tax, or simply protect your assets in some way after you become deceased)
  3. Your physical and permanent home is not in the UK and / or you are not a British citizen
  4. You live here in the UK but you have additional property abroad
  5. You own all or part of a UK business.
  6.  

see: Making a will - The Law Society. Please note that will making differs in Scotland and this website currently deals with English law.

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